This website has been conceived to help document and provide information about the mechanical time recorders used in offices and factories throughout the United Kingdom from the late 1800's up to the 1970's.

I have collected and restored many of the clocks pictured here, and gathered other information along the way. By no means complete, I would value any contributions in the way of pictures and information to fill in the gaps (and to correct any errors!). Please send any information, pictures or enquiries you may have to: brian@workclocks.co.uk

The earliest record of the invention of a worker's time recorder I have dates back to 1855, when a GB patent was granted to John Adams of Northampton, England for a time check machine (my thanks to Bob Simon from the USA for finding and sending me a copy). As far as I can establish, the first time recorders manufactured and used in the UK were by Llewellin's Machine Company (1883) and the Brook Time Check Company (1889). Time recorders manufactured in the USA (Bundy & Dey) were imported in the 1890's, and from 1902 by the International Time Recording Company which continued to manufacture and supply USA made clocks to the UK throughout the century. There were 3 other UK manufacturers formed in the early 1900's to compete with ITR; National Time Recorder Company Ltd and Gledhill-Brook Time Recorders Ltd, with Stockall as a smaller third manufacturer. Many of the USA and UK made clock models were re-badged by large distributors and service companies such as Blick Time Recorders Ltd and the British Time Recorder Company Ltd.

This website includes descriptions of the various models made (types), and many patents by the inventors (patents).

If you click on the logo's below, it will take you to a brief company history with relative information, and gives examples and photograghs of the clocks made:

Dey Time Registers Logo
International Time Recording Company Logo
Gledhill Logo
National Time Recorder Logo
Stockall Logo
Blick Logo
British Time Recorder Company Logo
Lambert Logo
 
Llewellin